Toward evidence-based legal education reform: First, let’s experiment (121)

21 October 2019

Legal Evolution (By Dan Rodriguez) — Professor Rodriguez (Northwestern Law) discusses how to collect data to support evidence-based legal education reform and offers suggestions on the ways law schools can innovate and experiment.  

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Experimentation in reforming legal education

21 October 2019

Excess of Democracy (By Derek T. Muller) — Professor Muller (Pepperdine Law) analyzes the Legal Evolution post from former Northwestern Law dean Dan Rodriguez on evidence-based legal education reform.  

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The Problems Of Measuring Scholarly Impact (‘Stuff’)

21 October 2019

Above the Law (By LawProfBlawg) — Anonymous law professor, LawProfBlawg, emphasizes the need for better metrics to measure scholarly impact.  

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Will artificial intelligence replace human lawyering?

21 October 2019

Legal Skills Prog Blog (By James B. Levy) — Professor Levy (Nova Southeastern Law) summarizes a recent Marquette Law Review article by three law professors that analyzes the prospect of artificial intelligence replacing the need for lawyers.  

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Gender Equity in Law School Enrollment: An Elusive Goal

21 October 2019

Legal Skills Prof Blog  (By Scott Fruehwald) — The author shares an upcoming Journal of Legal Education article by Deborah Jones Merritt (Ohio State University Law) and Kyle P. McEntee (Law School Transparency) on gender equity issues in law school admissions and possible solutions.  

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The Strangelovian Law School, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Casebook

21 October 2019

Madisonian (By Michael Madison) — Professor Madison (University of Pittsburgh Law) shares his third post in a series about case books and discusses the reasons behind their longevity in legal education.  

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Are We Hiding the Ball?

21 October 2019

Law School Academic Support Blog (By Marsha Griggs) — Professor Griggs (Washburn Law) provides advice on when and how to use the Socratic method to help law students learn and develop. 

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One Way to Examine the Educational Experience

21 October 2019

Law School Academic Support Blog (By Bill MacDonald) — Professor MacDonald (University at Buffalo Law) explains how the ‘community of inquiry’ model can be used to examine the effectiveness of courses, workshops or other legal education offerings.  

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The Best Learners…Might Not Be Who First Jumps to Mind

21 October 2019

Law School Academic Support Blog (By Scott Johns) — Referencing an article from The Wall Street Journal, Professor Johns (Denver Law) argues that the approach to legal education should be similar to early childhood development. He explains that babies use a combination of mirroring others, tinkering with solutions, and extrapolating conclusions, and suggests that law professors….

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