Call for Program Proposals

The AALS and its Arc of Career Committee and the Program Committee for the 2019 Annual Meeting are pleased to request proposals for the 2019 Annual Meeting to be held January 2 – 6, 2019 in New Orleans.

The 2019 Annual Meeting’s theme, selected by AALS President Wendy Perdue of the University of Richmond is Building Bridges. We encourage program organizers to consider that theme in framing their proposals.

Download the RFP to learn more about general and specific guidelines for each type of program.

Open Submission Programs RFP Arc of Career RFP

All proposals should be submitted using the online submission form.

  • Arc of Career programs address a broad range of matters related to the professional development, moving beyond presentations on substantive legal topics to include all aspects of the professional careers of law faculty and administrations. Proposals are due April 13, 2018.
  • Open Source programs are traditional scholarly programs other than those sponsored by one of the AALS Sections (e.g., Section on Criminal Justice). Proposals are due April 13, 2018.
  • Discussion Group programs provide a setting for discussions among a small group of invited participants. Attendees are welcome. Proposals are due April 13, 2018.
  • Symposium programs are extended sessions (half a day or longer) that focus on in-depth scholarly exploration of a topic of academic interest. Proposals are due May 11, 2018.
  • Hot Topic programs focus on topics that emerged too late in the year to be included in other types of programs. Proposals are due October 19, 2018.

 


 

Call for Proposals for Open Submission Programs
for the 2019 AALS Annual Meeting

The Program Committee for the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools is pleased to request proposals for “open submission” programs for the 2019 Annual Meeting to be held January 2 – 6, 2019 in New Orleans. Open submission programs are those which are not sponsored by an AALS Section. All annual meeting attendees are eligible to participate as speakers.

The 2019 Annual Meeting’s theme is Building Bridges. AALS President Wendy Perdue of the University of Richmond School of Law selected the theme because “As our society struggles with this problem of deep polarization, lawyers and law schools have an important role to play. Lawyers are, after all, in the dispute resolution business. Resolving conflict is central to what we do. And today, perhaps more than ever before, the skills that we as lawyers have, and we as law professors teach, is of critical importance.” We encourage program organizers to consider using the theme in framing their proposals but it is not a requirement.

There are four types of open submission programs for the 2019 Annual Meeting:

  • Open Source programs are traditional scholarly programs outside of section programming and not sponsored by one of the AALS Sections.
  • Discussion Group programs provide a setting for discussions among a small group of invited faculty.
  • Symposium programs are extended sessions (half day or longer) that focus on in-depth scholarly exploration of a topic of academic interest.
  • Hot Topic programs focus on topics that emerged too late in the year to be included in other types of programs.

Open Source, Discussion Group, and Hot Topic programs that are selected by the Committee will be scheduled by the AALS staff for 1 ¾ hour sessions.  By contrast, Symposium programs are full-day or half-day programs.

All program organizers should allow at least 15 minutes for audience participation.  We also welcome proposals for Open Source programs that depart from the typical format of having participants present 10-20 minute talks. Organizers could, for example, submit a proposal for a roundtable style program in which participants answer a series of questions posed by the moderator and the audience.  As another example, participants could engage in one or more role-play sessions.

Deadlines

Proposals for Open Source and Discussion Group programs are due April 13, 2018
Proposals for Symposium programs are due May 11, 2018
Proposals for Hot Topic programs are due October 19, 2018

General Submission Guidelines

Specific guidelines for submissions which apply to each specific type of program can be found below.  The following general guidelines apply to all open submission proposals.

Programs may be proposed by full-time faculty members or administrators at AALS Member or Fee-Paid law schools.  International faculty, visiting faculty (who do not retain a permanent affiliation at another law school), graduate students, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit proposals but may serve as presenters.

Proposals for Open Source and Symposium programs may reserve one or more spots for participants selected from a call for participation. Participants selected from a call for participation must be identified no later than September 29, 2018.

For Discussion Groups, calls for participation will follow a different process that is described in more detail below under the Discussion Group proposal details.

A proposal for any of the four program categories should include:

  • The program title.
  • The names and contact information of the program organizers.
  • A detailed description of the proposed program, including (a) the format of the proposed program, (b) an explanation of the overall goal of the program, and (c) if applicable, an indication that one or more speakers will be selected from a call for participants.
  • Names of speakers to be invited including their full names and schools with links to or copies of their curricula vitae.  The number of speakers should be limited to three (or a maximum of four) plus one moderator and should include a diversity of law schools, viewpoint, gender, race, and years of experience. Discussion Group proposals should have no fewer than 8, and no more than 15 invited participants, with 12 being the strongly preferred max.
  • If applicable, name the journal or edited volume that will be publishing the program.

Program organizers should take the AALS core value of diversity into account when developing their proposal.  Organizers are also encouraged to include junior faculty and participants who provide viewpoint diversity appropriate to the program as well as representation from a wide range of types of law schools. The scheduled program time should be used only for the academic discussion itself; if there is any “business” to take care of (e.g., discussion of whether to form a new AALS Section, or combine with an existing one, etc.), that should take place outside of the allotted time.

Examples of successful proposals submitted in prior years are available.

Open Source Programs

Proposals Due: April 13, 2018

Open Source Programs are traditional scholarly programs other than those proposed by an AALS Section.

Proposals should follow the general guidelines set forth above.

In reviewing Open Source Program proposals, the Committee will consider the overall quality of the program, including whether:

  • The program is likely to be of interest to Annual Meeting attendees;
  • There is a diversity of presenters, including diversity of schools, viewpoints, and backgrounds;
  • The proposal is well written and thoughtfully constructed; and
  • Junior participants will be included.

Open Source Program proposals are due April 13, 2017 and should be submitted using the online submission form.

Questions may be directed to opensource@aals.org.

Discussion Group Programs

Proposals Due: April 13, 2018

A Discussion Group program provides a small group of faculty the opportunity to engage in a sustained conversation about a topic of interest to the participants. Discussion Group sessions will not feature formal presentations. Discussion Group participants will typically be expected to write and share a short presentation summary (3-5 pages) as part of their participation.  These written summaries are intended to facilitate a lively and engaging real-time round table discussion among the participants.

Discussion Groups could be limited to a single substantive area and subject (e.g., “Equitable Remedies in Civil Rights Litigation”).  Ideally, however, Discussion Groups will offer an opportunity for faculty in cross-cutting fields to bring useful perspectives to the conversation.  For example, a Discussion Group on “Free Speech and Community Policing” could invite perspectives from multiple vantage points, obviously including public law and criminal law, but also including critical, feminist, and comparative law perspectives as well.

A Discussion Group program should feature no fewer than 8, and no more than 15, invited participants, with 12 invited participants being the strongly preferred maximum.  The proposal should identify approximately 2/3 of the participants or possible invitees, and the balance will then be invited from an open call that the AALS staff will disseminate after the proposal is accepted. As with other programs at the Annual Meeting, attendees who are not invited Discussion Group participants are welcome to attend the Discussion Group as observers, and at some point during the program, the moderator should open up discussion to all attendees.

Proposals for a Discussion Group program should follow the general submission guidelines set forth above.   For all accepted proposals, the Annual Meeting Program Committee and the AALS staff will post calls for participation and will facilitate the program organizers’ review of the submissions.  The final participant list is subject to review and approval by the Program Committee.  Once the participants are identified, the organizers are requested to solicit 1-page Abstracts from them and distribute them among the participants in advance of the meeting.

Organizers are also expected to moderate the Discussion Group unless another moderator is identified in the proposal.  Organizers are responsible for ensuring timely communication among the participants prior to the Annual Meeting, including disseminating any abstract or paper requirements and deadlines for circulating to participants.

In reviewing Discussion Group Program proposals, the Committee will consider the overall quality of the program, including whether:

  • The program is likely to lead to an interesting and constructive discussion among the participants;
  • There is a diversity of presenters, including diversity of schools, viewpoints, and backgrounds;
  • The proposal is well written and thoughtfully constructed; and
  • Junior participants will be included in the group.

Discussion Group Program proposals are due April 13, 2018 and should be submitted using the online submission form.

Questions may be directed to discussiongroup@aals.org.

Symposium Programs

Proposals Due: May 11, 2018

Symposium programs are full-day or half-day programs that focus on an in-depth scholarly exploration of a topic of academic interest.  The Committee encourages symposium program organizers to arrange for the publication of the papers in a journal or edited volume.

In addition to following the general submission guidelines set forth above, symposium proposals should also include:

  • An abstract of up to 750 words describing the program and its anticipated contribution to legal scholarship.
  • Abstracts of up to 250 words describing each proposed symposium paper.
  • If requesting a full-day or half-day Symposium.
  • A description of any publication arrangement (or potential arrangement) for the program in a journal or edited volume.

If the Symposium will be published in a student-edited law review, the AALS will waive the registration fee for up to two student editors to attend the Annual Meeting.

In reviewing Symposium Program proposals, the Committee will consider the overall quality of the program, including whether:

  • The abstracts reflect papers that are likely to contribute substantially to the scholarship in the field;
  • The program is likely to be of interest to Annual Meeting attendees;
  • There is a diversity of presenters, including diversity of schools, viewpoints, and backgrounds;
  • The proposal is well written and thoughtfully constructed; and
  • Junior participants will be included in the program.

Symposium Program proposals are due May 11, 2018 and should be submitted using the online submission form.

Questions may be directed to symposium@aals.org.

Hot Topic Programs

Proposals Due: October 19, 2018

Hot Topic programs focus on topics that emerged too late in the year to be included in other types of programs.  Hot Topic Program proposals that are selected by the committee will be assigned a program time slot that cannot be changed to accommodate speakers due to scheduling constraints.

In addition to following the general submission guidelines set forth above, Hot Topic proposals should include an explanation of why the topic is “hot” and why it was not possible to make the proposal in one of the other program categories with an earlier deadline.

Hot Topic Program Organizers should check the preliminary Annual Meeting program on the AALS website to be sure that there is no direct conflict between the proposed topic and a program already on the schedule.  The Committee will narrowly construe this requirement and will try to avoid disqualifying proposals due to conflict with an existing program.

In reviewing Hot Topic Program proposals, the Committee will consider the overall quality of the program, including whether:

  • The proposed topic is “hot” and could not have been made in one of the other program categories with an earlier deadline
  • The program is likely to be of interest to Annual Meeting attendees;
  • There is a diversity of presenters, including diversity of schools, viewpoints, and backgrounds;
  • The proposal is well written and thoughtfully constructed; and
  • Junior participants will be included in the program.

Hot Topic Program proposals are due October 19, 2018 and should be submitted using the online submission form.

Questions may be directed to hottopic@aals.org.

Program Committee for the 2019 Annual Meeting

Kathleen Boozang, Seton Hall University School of Law, Chair
Steve Calabresi, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law
Jessica Erickson, The University of Richmond School of Law
Steve Mulroy, The University of Memphis, Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
Dara Purvis, Penn State Law


 

Call for Proposals for Arc of Career Programs
for the 2019 AALS Annual Meeting

Proposals due: April 13, 2018

As part of the AALS’s efforts to respond to the needs and interests of its members, the AALS Arc of Career Committee encourages programming at the Annual Meeting to address a broad spectrum of issues related to professional development.  In place of presentations on substantive legal topics, Arc of Career sessions address a broad range of matters related to the professional careers of law faculty and administrators. The Committee hopes to include perspectives for all legal education professionals, including tenure and tenure-track faculty, contract and special faculty, administrators and other constituencies.

The AALS Arc of Career Committee requests proposals for creative and interactive sessions on professional development issues broadly conceived for the 2019 AALS Annual Meeting to be held January 2-6, 2019, in New Orleans, LA. Successful sessions at past Annual Meetings included, among others, sessions on joining the administration, career issues for post-tenured faculty, building and sustaining academic communities, preparing for life beyond the legal academy, and retirement.  We offer this list as illustration, not limit the kinds of topics that would be appropriate for sessions. Indeed, other topics may arise from critiques raised in last year’s sessions, such as:  Is the arc of career an appropriate metaphor for legal education professionals today? Are other metaphors more appropriate and, if so, what are they? What other issues remain submerged or unaddressed in these changing times in legal education?

The Committee will continue to offer each year a session for first-time meeting attendees on How Do I Get the Most Out of the Annual Meeting? And to offer every other year So You Want to Publish a Book.

Recent Arc of Career sessions have included:

  • Design Thinking for Law Professors
  • Opportunities and Challenges for Faculty of Color in Skills-Focused Law Teaching and Law Administration
  • The Legal Writing Lateral
  • Branching Out in Your Post-Tenure Career
  • Building and Sustaining Academic Communities Through Blogging and Other Tools
  • Chartering New Waters: Clinicians’ Post-Tenure Reflections
  • Transitions: Preparing For Life Beyond the Legal Academy

General Submission Guidelines

Programs may be proposed by full-time faculty members or administrators at AALS Member or Fee-Paid law schools.  International faculty; visiting faculty (who do not retain a permanent affiliation at another law school); graduate students; and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit proposals but may serve as presenters.

Additional Information

Proposals should describe the concept or theme of the session and the mode(s) of presentation and include a full or partial list of suggested speakers/facilitators, but need not be more than 2 – 5 pages long.

Strong preference will be given to proposals that incorporate interactive experiences for the audience other than or in addition to Q and A. Preference will also be given to proposals:

  • Submitted by collaborative groups spanning more than one law school;
  • With an interdisciplinary element and/or suggestions of participants with perspectives from other disciplines. (Funds of $900 may be available for one non-law school speaker);
  • Reflecting diversity of schools and presenters (viewpoint, geography, race, gender, institutional rankings, etc.)

Arc of Career Program proposals are due by April 13, 2018 and should be submitted using the online submission form.

Questions may be directed to arc@lists.aals.org.

The AALS Task Force on Professional Development

Kristi Bowman, Michigan State University College of Law
Kay P. Kindred, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
S. David Mitchell, University of Missouri School of Law
Vivian I. Neptune Rivera, University of Puerto Rico School of Law
Bradley A. Smith, Capital University Law School
Michael E. Waterstone, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, Chair