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Deans & Legal Education
A Selected Bibliography

Introduction
Accreditation Issues
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Advice
Diversity
External Deaning

Fiscal Issues
International
Law School Constituencies
Law School Mission
Leadership
Legal Education

Public/Private
Reflections
Resignations/Retirements
Strategic Planning
Miscellaneous New Programs/Specific Events

Reflections

Linda L. Ammoms, Negotiating Paths, Creepy Crawly Creatures and Things that Go Bump in the Night:  The Cautionary Tale of a Fourth Year Dean, 41 U. Tol. L. Rev. 255 (2010). 
The author reflects on the rewards and challenges of four years of deaning, using the metaphor of her daily walk.

Peter C. Alexander, Commentary:  Deciding to Become a Dean, 31 Seattle U. L. Rev. 819 (2008).
The author reflects on his experience as a candidate for the deanship of the law school at the University of Southern Illinois and on the challenges he faces as dean. 

Peter C. Alexander, The Six-Year Honeymoon, 40 U. Tol. L. Rev. 273 (2009). 
The author reflects on his term as dean of Southern Illinois Law School and the three factors that lead to his success in that position:  choosing the right school as a dean candidate, letting the faculty lead, and transparency.

Hannah R. Arterian, The Dean and the Web: Charlotte’s Web as a Dean’s Parable, 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 1 (2003).
The author discusses her first year as a dean, using an extended comparison to Charlotte’s Web.  She focuses specifically on how the dean interacts with various law school constituencies. 

Richard B. Atkinson, Untitled and Coerced, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 7 (2004).
The author has written an essay on his first twenty months of being a dean

Jeffrey A. Brauch, The Law School Special Event: Lessons Learned in Our Twentieth Year, 38 U. Tol. L. Rev. 507 (2007).

The author recounts how event planning for the twentieth anniversary of Regent Law School played a key roll in celebrating both the anniversary and “taught us…about the place special events [play] in the life of the law school.”

Brian Bromberger, On Being an Old Rookie, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 15 (2004).
The author ruminates on entering the 80-year old law school at Loyola University New Orleans School of Law as an experienced dean.

John L. Carroll, Words of Wisdom for Deans from Mick Jagger and Others, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 29 (2004).
The author sums up his three years of deanship in the quotations above.

Jim Chen, Truth and Beauty:  A Legal Translation, 41 U. Tol. L. Rev. 261 (2010). 
In this brief essay, the author uses the concluding couplet of Keats’s Ode on a Grecian Urn as a framework to consider the nature of law and legal education. 

R. Lawrence Dessem, Top Ten Reasons to Be a Law School Dean, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 19 (2001). 
As the title suggests, the author gives a number of reasons for becoming and remaining a law school dean.  He also discusses the gratification he derived from serving as dean.

John D. Feerick, A Few Reflections on a Long Deanship, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 25 (2001).
The author reflects on twenty years of service as the dean of Fordham Law School, emphasizing the importance of the relationships he formed during that time.

John W. Fisher, II & Alvin H. Moss, Confronting Death in the Academy: A Dialogue, 37 U. Tol. L. Rev. 75 (2005).
The author writes about his experience as dean dealing with the terminal illness of a faculty member and the many nuances of being the administrator in charge of the transition from diagnosis to death.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr., So It Goes, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 31 (2001).
This is the first installment in a series of reflections on deanship, presented as a dialogue between a younger and a more experienced law dean.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr., Beach Talk, 34 U. Tol. L. Rev. 65 (2002).
This is the second installment in a series of reflections on deanship, presented as a dialogue between a younger and a more experienced law dean.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr., Scholarship Rag, 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 55 (2003).
This is the third installment in a series of reflections on deanship, presented as a dialogue between a younger and a more experienced law dean.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr., A Running Conversation, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 65 (2004).
This is the fourth installment in a series of reflections on deanship, presented as a dialogue between a younger and a more experienced law dean.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr. The Parable of the Three Floods, 37 U. Tol. L. Rev. 95 (2005).
The author offers his stream of consciousness thoughts on being a dean as he steps down from that role.

Thomas C. Galligan, Jr., Change is Good, 38 U. Tol. L. Rev. 513 (2007).
This is the fifth installment in a series of reflections on deanship, presented as a dialogue between a younger and a more experienced law dean.

I. Richard Gershon, Field of Deans, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 49 (2001).
The author compares deaning to managing a baseball team.

C. Peter Goplerud, III, Observations from the Skybox, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 53 (2001).
Another extended sports analogy, comparing running a law school to running a sports team. 

Claudio Grossman, Reflections on Being a Law School Dean in an Interconnected World, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 609 (2000).
The author discusses his experience as dean of a law school with an international focus. 

Thomas F. Guernsey, Beware of Navel Oranges, 34 U. Tol. L. Rev. 81 (2002).
The author briefly presents fifteen things he has learned about being dean.

H. Reese Hansen, Except for the Problems, Being a Dean is a Very Good Job, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 77 (2001).
The author discusses his own experience as a dean and the problems he has faced in his twenty years of service. 

Timothy J. Heinsz, Deaning Today: A Worthwhile Endeavor – If You Have the Time, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 615 (2000).
The author discusses his experience as a longer term dean and advocates that ten years, rather than five, may be an optimal term length for deans.

Colleen A. Khoury, Ruminations on a Deanship, 34 U. Tol. L. Rev. 105 (2002).
The author describes her experiences as a dean, focusing on how her concerns have changed as she has served more time in the position. 

James M. Klebba, Confessions of a Recidivist Interim Dean, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 91 (2001).
The author discusses the advantages and disadvantages of serving as an interim dean, drawing on his own experience serving three times in that position.

Norman Lefstein, Reflections of a Long-Serving Dean, 34 U. Tol. L. Rev. 109 (2002).
The author offers observations and advice based on his long term of service as a dean.

David F. Levi, From Judge to Dean: Reflections on the Bench and the Academy, 70 La. L. Rev. 913 (2010).
The author reflects his transition from federal judge to law school dean and asks “whether there might be some unifying theme within which we might see the roles of the judge and the dean as in harmony with some greater purpose and as part of some greater tradition.”

Richard A. Matasar, Ya Gotta Pay the Pig, 37 U. Tol. L. Rev. 109 (2005).
The author ruminates on the forces that sometimes drive deans, especially those who have been at it a while, to begin to doubt whether they have anything left to contribute.  He also looks at the internal pressures that create negative thoughts, the external forces that produce fatalism, and the consequences of becoming sour and sarcastic.

Daniel J. Morrissey, Harry Truman and the Joy of Deaning, 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 153 (2003).
The author uses anecdotes from the presidency of Harry Truman to illustrate the lessons he has learned from twice serving as a dean.

Nancy B. Rapoport, Going From “Us” to “Them” in Sixty Seconds, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 703 (2000).
The author briefly addresses some of the pitfalls of becoming a dean, with specific reference to relationships with faculty. 

Nancy B. Rapoport, Decanal Haiku, 37 U. Tol. L. Rev. 131 (2005).
The author has crafted amusing haikus on being a dean.

Nancy B. Rapoport, Reflections of a Former Dean in Law School Leadership Strategies: Top Deans on Benchmarking Success, Incorporating Feedback from Faculty and Students, and Building the Endowment 2006, 197-206 (Inside the Minds Series 2006).
The author reflects on what she learned from her six years’ service as the dean of the University of Houston Law Center. 

Jim Rosenblatt, Lessons Learned by a New Dean, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 151 (2004).
The author recounts the lessons he learned in his first year as dean of the Mississippi College Law School, beginning with his job search and preparation for decanal duties, to reflecting upon the opportunities he had as dean to use his imagination, experience, energy, insight, and resolve to serve the law school and greater legal community.

Laura Rothstein, Ed Sullivan and I Love Lucy: Images of Deaning – Students as a Key Internal Constituency, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 167 (2001).
The author, who became dean after serving as associate dean for student affairs, describes why she believes that student affairs was good preparation for deanship.  She also offers advice for ensuring that student life concerns are addressed, along with a dean’s other duties.

Michael D. Sabbath, Should You Accept the Position of Interim Dean? Some Observations from Someone Who Did, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 159 (2004).
The author shares his experience of serving two years as interim dean at Mercer University School of Law and how that experience helped him to contribute better to the law school.

David E. Shipley, The Personal Side of a Deanship, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 739 (2000). 
This article was first presented as After Dinner Comments at the ABA's June 2000 Seminar for New Law School Deans.  It discusses the author’s own experiences as a three-time dean. 

Jon H. Sylvester & Anthony J. Pagano, It's Not Just a Job, It's an Adventure!, 34 U. Tol. L. Rev. 165 (2002).
The authors offer their perspectives on the jobs Dean and Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

Symeon C. Symeonides, On Deaning, Writing, and Roses, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 217 (2001).
The author discusses how he manages to find time to continue teaching and writing, in addition to his meeting his responsibilities as dean. 

William Michael Treanor, Deans and Stories, 36 U. Tol. L. Rev. 207 (2004).
Leading Minds, by Howard Gardner, is a study of leadership that argues that effective story-telling is critical to effective leadership. The author illustrates the relationship between Gardner's thesis and what deans do or should do to lead their law schools vis-à-vis the example of Robert Maynard Hutchins, who was dean of Yale Law School and then president of the University of Chicago.

Paul R. Verkuil, Hitting for the Academic Cycle, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 245 (2001).
The author discusses his experience making the transition from professor to dean to president of the law school, using an extended analogy to baseball.

Allan W. Vestal, “Today the Administration Building Burned Down…” Notes from My First Year as Dean, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 251 (2001).
The author reflects on his first year as dean, focusing on the need for a law school to be involved with both the university and the wider community.

Allan W. Vestal, “A River to My People…” Notes from My Fifth Year as Dean, 37 U. Tol. L. Rev. 179 (2005).
The author draws six threads from the movie Lawrence of Arabia to illustrate how good deans approach the job.

Glen Weissenberger, I Apologize for this Essay, 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 195 (2003).
The author reflects on the necessity and usefulness of apologizing.    

Patricia D. White, Brief Reflections on the Enterprise, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 773 (2000).
The author discusses her experiences as a dean and concludes that deaning has more in common with being a lawyer than a law professor. 

L. Kinvin Wroth, Thoughts on Decanal Recidivism, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 269 (2001). 
The author discusses his two experiences serving as dean, with particular focus on how much legal education and the law school environment have changed between his two stints as dean.

Michael K. Young, And What Surprised You Most About Your New Job?, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 275 (2001).
The author recounts his experience being dean, focusing particularly on what he enjoys about his job.