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Deans & Legal Education
A Selected Bibliography

Introduction
Accreditation Issues
Admissions
Advice
Diversity
External Deaning

Fiscal Issues
International
Law School Constituencies
Law School Mission
Leadership
Legal Education

Public/Private
Reflections
Resignations/Retirements
Strategic Planning
Miscellaneous New Programs/Specific Events

Law School Mission

Jeffrey A. Brauch, It Sounded Great in the Glossy Brochure…So Where Is It? Carrying Out the Mission at a Mission Driven School, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 1 (2001).
The author discusses the importance of integrating the mission of a law school into all aspects of the school, particularly faculty training.  He discusses approaches taken at his institution, Regent Law School, and offers advice for doing so at other schools. 

Jeffrey A. Brauch, The Student-Faculty Retreat, 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 23 (2003).
The author briefly discusses the success of Regent University’s Faculty-Student retreat that focused on the law school’s mission – to mentor students on how to bring a Christian perspective to how they live and practice law. 

Katherine S. Broderick, The Nation's Urban Land-Grant Law School: Ensuring Justice in the 21st Century, 40 U. Tol. L. Rev. 305 (2009). 
The author discusses how the University of the District of Columbia’s David Clarke School of Law structures its admissions, faculty, and curriculum, especially its clinical programs, to meet its mission of promoting social justice and opening the legal profession to groups historically underrepresented at the bar.

Richardson R. Lynn, Mission Possible: Hiring for a Mission in a Vague World, 33 U. Tol. L. Rev. 107 (2001).
The author presents advice on how to us the law school’s mission as a guide in hiring faculty.

Thomas M. Mengler, Celebrating the Multiple Missions of a Research University-based Law School, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 681 (2000).
The author discusses the system at University of Illinois College of Law for evaluating tenure-track faculty, which strives to evaluate a faculty member’s overall contribution to the law school in many areas, rather than focusing primarily on scholarship as the evaluation criterion. 

Thomas M. Mengler, What’s Faith Got To Do With It? (With Apologies to Tina Turner), 35 U. Tol. L. Rev. 145 (2003).
The author discusses his law school’s faith-based mission and its focus on mentoring students, forming students’ characters, and fostering public service and a sense of the practice of law as a vocation.  

Rex R. Perschbacher, The Public Responsibilities of a Public Law School, 31 U. Tol. L. Rev. 693 (2000).
The author discusses some ways in which the educational missions and civic responsibilities of public law schools differ from those of private institutions.

Kellye Y. Testy, Leading for Mission in Law School Leadership Strategies: Top Deans on Benchmarking Success, Incorporating Feedback from Faculty and Students, and Building the Endowment 2006, 223-232 (Inside the Minds Series 2006).
The author considers the dean’s role in implementing the law school’s mission.