AALS Annual Meeting

Reassessing Our roles as scholars and educators in light of change

Program

*Programs marked with an asterisk have arranged for the publication of papers related to their Annual Meeting program in a Law Review or Journal.

+Programs marked with a plus-sign have issued a Call for Papers to select one or more presenters.

Open Source Programs are programs selected by a committee in a competitive search.
Joint Programs are designation for two Sections holding only one program between them.
Co-Sponsored Programs are designations for Sections holding more than one program.
Open Programs are sessions organized by law school faculty to consider the creation of a new AALS Section.

Go to:

Wednesday, January 3

Friday, January 4

Saturday, January 5

Sunday, January 6

Thursday, January 3

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
AALS Registration
Americas Hall II, Third Floor, Hilton New Yor
k

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
AALS Office and Information Center
Gibson Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
AALS Message Center
Rhinelander Gallery, Second Floor, Hilton New York

7:30 - 8:30 a.m.
Twelve Step Meeting
Hudson Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
AALS Exhibit Hall Open House “The Meeting Place”
Americas Hall I and II, Third Floor, Hilton New York

Exhibitors will display a variety of academic, teaching and administrative products and services of interest to those in legal education. Refreshments will be served in the morning and afternoon in the “Meeting Place” in the Exhibit Hall.

AALS Workshops

9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
[4110] Joint AALS and Conference of Chief Justices Workshop on the Courts: Independence and Accountability

9:15 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
[4120] Workshop on Local Government at Risk: Immigration, Land Use, National Security and the Battle for Control

AALS Committee Event

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
AALS Committee on International Cooperation Program
Gramercy A, Second Floor, Hilton New York
International Cooperation and The Role of U.S. Law Schools
All sessions will be held in Gramercy A, Second Floor, Hilton New York, unless otherwise stated.

This program will analyze research, teaching and service initiatives involving international cooperation, as well as the theoretical notions underlying the notion concept of international cooperation, with the purpose of sharing the experiences of U.S. law schools in this area. The program will allow for the identification of best practices, opening up opportunities to further develop international cooperation initiatives. The specific purpose of each panel is described below.

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Teaching
Moderator: Alison W. Conner, University of Hawaii William S. Richardson School of Law
Speakers: Virginia B. Gordan, The University of Michigan Law School
Willajeanne Mclean, University of Connecticut School of Law
Stewart J. Schwab, Cornell Law School
Mark E. Wojcik, The John Marshall Law School

This panel will focus on the role of teaching in developing truly international exchanges and involving more faculty members in cooperative programs. The emphasis will be on best practices: what concrete steps can U.S. law schools take to participate actively and successfully in teaching exchanges? Panelists will discuss: Teaching opportunities, such as Fulbright programs and visitorships that allow American law professors to work actively with foreign colleagues and students; Ways to integrate international colleagues and courses into their own programs, through such methods as visitorships and intensive specialty courses; Co-teaching with international colleagues and visiting scholars, along with the use of online courses and satellite technology.

10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions on International and Comparative Research
These concurrent sessions will explore issues relating to comparative and international research. In recent decades, increasing number of United States and foreign faculty have undertaken international or comparative research either on their own or in conjunction with faculty at foreign law schools. These panels explore the “ins” and “outs” of comparative and international research focusing on why faculty undertake the research, the “nuts and bolts” of such research, and some of the pitfalls and difficulties. Each of the panelists has undertaken a major international or comparative research project.

  • International Law
    Moderator: Linda O. Smiddy, Vermont Law School
    Speakers: Mark A. Drumbl, Washington and Lee University School of Law
    Billie Jo Kaufman, American University Washington College of Law
    John C. Knechtle, Florida Coastal School of Law
    Ellen S. Podgor, Stetson University College of Law
    Kenneth M. Rosen, The University of Alabama School of Law

    It is not surprising that significant numbers of international and trans-national law faculty have engaged in international and comparative research. This panel presents the perspectives of some international law teachers who regularly engage in such research.
  • Comparative Research by Non-International Law Faculty
    Gramercy B, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Vincent Paul Cardi, West Virginia University College of Law
    Speakers: Laurence Boissier, Professor, Université Montpellier III-Paul Valéry, Montpellier, France
    Bruce P. Elman, Dean, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada
    Ronald James Krotoszynski, Jr., Washington and Lee University School of Law
    Russell L. Weaver, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

    In recent years, increasing numbers of non-international law faculty have added a comparative or international law component to their work. This panel presents a number of faculty who do not teach international or trans-national law, but who regularly engage in comparative or international work. It also includes an English professor at a French university who regularly assists with comparative legal research.

2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
Service
Moderator: Claudio Grossman, American University Washington College of Law
Speakers: Jose Enrique Alvarez, Columbia University School of Law
S. James Anaya, The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law
Deborah Enix-Ross, Litigation Practice Group Manager, Debevoise and Plimpton LLP, New York, New York
Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law
Frans Viljoen, Professor, Faculty of Law University of Pretoria, Petaria, South Africa

This panel will identify the international initiatives, programs and opportunities that exist within law schools for students and faculty to do pro bono and public interest work; Challenges to ensure proper supervision as well as issues involved in securing a sound academic experience; A typology of service opportunities including externships, non-legal work without credit (voluntary work during spring break), participation in impact litigation, etc.; Issues of insurance, funding, and other relevant practical topics.

3:45 - 5:15 p.m.
International Cooperation
Moderator: T. Alexander Aleinikoff, Georgetown University Law Center
Speakers: Rosa Brooks, Georgetown University Law Center
William H. Neukom, Esq., Kirkpatrick and Lockhart Preston Gates Ellis, LLP, Seattle, Washington, and ABA President
Paul B. Stephan, III, University of Virgina School of Law
Joseph H. Weiler, New York University School of Law

This panel will critically examine what a genuine commitment to international engagement should involve. Issues to be examined include: goals served by the internationalization of US law schools, the meaning of “internationalization” and “globalization;” is “cooperation” strictly self-interested, or is it geared towards the advancement of some vision of global cooperation and global rule of law? Is it all of the above?

AALS Events

9:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Sections on Environmental Law and Natural Resources Joint Field Trip
Flora and Fauna Amidst Climate Change - The New York Botanical Garden and Wildlife Conservation Society
A visit to the Bronx Zoo and the New York Botanical Garden

The bus will depart from the Hilton New York’s 54th street entrance, near the tour desk.

The first stop of the field trip is New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx for a visit to this world class botanical research facility and the oldest remnant forest primeval in New York City. We’ll hear lectures from world renown research scientists on the challenges that climate changed present for flora. After a short special tour of the research facilities and (weather permitting) the ex situ botanical specimens on the grounds, we shall have lunch at the Garden and then move to the world famous “Bronx Zoo, to meet with internationally recognized scientists working on both in situ and ex situ protection of flora, and lectures on the implications of climate change on wildlife habitat. A visit to the facilities of the Wildlife Conservation Society and the historic Bronx Zoo grounds would take the afternoon.

FIELD TRIP LUNCHEON SPEAKER: Lyle Glowka, Senior Legal Officer Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Montreal, Canada

(Tickets were sold in advance of Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2nd or at the bus departure point on Thursday, January 3rd.)

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Institutional Advancement
-view full Institutional Advanecment program (PDF)-
Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

1:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Section on Pro-Bono and Public Service Opportunities Service Project
Visit to the Bronx Defenders

The trip will provide an opportunity to learn about one of the most innovative non-profit advocacy organizations in the country. The Bronx Defenders brings together interdisciplinary work groups combing criminal defense lawyers, client advocates, investigators, and family court advocates to address both immediate criminal charges and the host of issues that drive their clients into the system.

The bus will depart from the Hilton New York’s 54th street entrance, near the tour desk.

(It was necessary to sign up for this event in advance. If space is available, you may board the bus at the departure point.)

8:45 - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Socio-Economics, Co-Sponsored by Sections on Jurisprudence, Minority Groups, Poverty Law and Women in Legal Education
Murray Hill B, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Socio-Economics and Economic Justice

All sessions will be held in Murray Hill A, Second Floor, Hilton New York, unless otherwise stated.

8:45 - 9:00 a.m.
Welcome
Speakers: Robert Ashford, Syracuse University College of Law

The three-paragraph definition of socio-economics (signed by over one hundred twenty law teachers from more than fifty American law schools to establish the AALS Section on Socio-Economics) has both positive and normative dimensions that parallel lawyers’ professional responsibilities regarding facts, values and the duty to improve the law for the benefit of society. As such, it provides a holistic approach to law-related economic issues that especially helpful to lawyers. This year’s program explores positive and normative aspects of socio-economics that can enhance teaching, research and service.

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Deans’ Forum on ` and Economic Justice
Speakers: Jim Chen, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law
Roger J. Dennis, Rutgers, The State University of N.J. School of Law, Camden
I. Richard Gershon, Charleston School of Law
Dennis R. Honabach, Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law
Donald J. Polden, Santa Clara University School of Law
Edward L. Rubin, Vanderbilt University Law School
Emily A. Spieler, Northeastern University School of Law
Kellye Y. Testy, Seattle University School of Law

In this session, eight law school deans supportive of socio-economics share their views on (1) the relationship between socio-economics and economic justice, (2) the importance of the socio-economic approach in legal education, and (3) ways to enhance the understanding and use of socio-economic analysis in legal education.

10:10 - 11:10 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions

  • Corporate Governance, Fiduciary Duties, and Social Responsibility
    Murray Hill B, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Wendy Nicole Duong, University of Denver
    Jose M. Gabilondo, Florida International University College of Law
    Robert C. Hockett, Cornell Law School
    Cheryl Lyn Wade, St. John’s University School of Law

    This session explores analyses that suggests that corporate fiduciaries can better maximize corporate and shareholder wealth by approaching economic issues from a socio-economic foundation rather than from neoclassical perspective. To understand how best to promote corporate wealth maximization from a socio-economic perspective, one shifts primary attention from the static neoclassical notion of “the size of the pie” that results from the efficient allocation of resources to a dynamic focus on participation in the financing and operation of the bakery. Socio-economic analysis indicates that major corporations may have a significant wealth-maximizing interest in strategies that promise to enhance (1) stakeholder wealth and (2) sustainable demand for their productive capacity. This session explores ways in which corporations can enhance corporate wealth by benefiting their stakeholders and by taking a long-term view of wealth maximization.
  • Socio-Economic Dimensions of Academic Freedom In Katrina’s Wake
    Morgan Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Matthew W. Finkin, University of Illinois College of Law
    Robert Ashford, Syracuse University College of Law
    Jordan Kurland, Associate General Secretary, American Association of University Professors, Washington, D.C.
    David M. Rabban, The University of Texas School of Law

    The hegemony of any dominant paradigm of mainstream thinking in one or more disciplines raises questions of academic freedom for professors who teach, research, and serve in ways that challenge the reasons for the paradigm’s dominance. Economic realities affect the exercise and protection of academic freedom, and the quality of academic affects economic realities

    In the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure of American Association of University Professors (AAUP), universities and colleges may terminate the “continuous appointment” tenured faculty members when the termination is “because of financial exigency...demonstrably bona fide.” Following Hurricane Katrina, certain universities in New Orleans determined to terminate the tenured employment of scores of tenured professors citing the economic exigency. An AAUP Special Committee on Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans Universities found that there was “nearly universal departure from (or in some cases complete abandonment of) personnel and other policies” by five New Orleans institutions. The Report resulted in four censures. In this session, representatives of the AAUP responsible for the investigation will present and discuss the Report and the response to it.
  • Telecommunications and the Internet, Race, Ethnicity, Language, and Socio-Economics
    Clinton Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Leonard M. Baynes, St. John’s University School of Law
    Allen Hammond, Santa Clara University School of Law
    Catherine J.K. Sandoval, Santa Clara University School of Law
    Anthony Eudelio Varona, American University Washington College of Law

    This panel will explore the intersection of telecommunications law and policy with race, ethnicity, language and gender issues. Panelists will explore issues including the digital divide in access to telecommunications technology, minority ownership of media, antitrust market definition and the Federal Communications Commission’s proceeding regarding whether the rules about broadcast ownership should be changed.
  • How White-Collar Criminologists Are Falsifying The Conventional Economic Wisdom and Building Socio-Economic Theory
    Madison Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: William K. Black, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
    Robert E. Prasch, Professor, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont
    Robert Tillman, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, St. John’s University, Jamaica, New York
    Susan Will, Professor, John Jay College, New York, New York

    The Nobel Laureate in Economics, George Stigler, proudly proclaimed economics “The Imperial Science” and dismissed other social science disciplines as non-sciences. The claim that neo-classical economics provides a uniquely, and universally, valid means for understanding society was asserted as self-evident truth. Stigler’s imperial pretensions have suffered badly as neo-classical economics’ predictions have been falsified by events. Neo-classical economics’ predictions with regard to white-collar crime have proved particularly embarrassing. White-collar criminologists have, since their inception, demonstrated the falsity of neo-classical economists’ predictions about white-collar crime and criminals. Logically, “if it’s bad criminology, it’s bad economics.” White-collar criminologists, however, have gone beyond falsifying erroneous neo-classical theories and have launched a multidisciplinary development of theory that has been shown to have superior predictive power. The logic is: “if it’s good white-collar criminology, it’s good economics.” A panel of experts in white-collar criminology will discuss the development of modern theories of corporate misconduct.

11:20 a.m - 12:20 p.m.
Social Entrepreneurship and Socio-Economics
Speakers: William Drayton, Ashoka, Arlington, Virginia

Socio-economists believe in doing good scholarship and research that does good. With a socio-economic approach to economic analysis, much good can be done in a market economy by way of education, practice and service. Two supporters of the socio-economic approach who have a long personal history of activist leadership in aid of social and economic reform, Mr. Drayton and Mr. Monks will share their experience, views, and plans.

12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Section on Socio-Economics Luncheon
Mercury Rotunda, Third Floor, Hilton New York
Socio-Economics and Academic Freedom
Speaker: Robert M. O'Neil, Director, Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression, Charlottesville, Virginia

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

2:10 - 3:10 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

  • Biolaw and Socio-Economics: Are Market Incentives a Bane or a Boon to Biodiversity?
    Madison Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: June Rose Carbone, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
    Speakers: Rebecca M. Bratspies, City University of New York School of Law at Queens College
    Chrisotpher Michael Holman, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
    Andrew W. Torrance, University of Kansas School of Law

    Concerns about global warming, biodiversity, and genetically modified organisms underscore the importance of a global approach to environmental issues. This panel will consider what socio-economics, with its attention to the interaction between markets and the common good, can contribute to the development of a global infrastructure for environmental issues. In particular, the panel will focus on the role of intellectual property in promoting biodiversity and sustainability, and the intersection of law and changing technology in the regulation of genetically modified organisms.
  • Binary Economics and the History of Economic Thought
    Murray Hill B, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Harold Channer, Producer, Conversations with Harold Channer, New York, New York
    Larry Gell, President, International Agency for Economic Development, New York, NY
    Sidney M. Greenfield, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Scott Goldberg, President, Scott Goldberg Films, New York, NY
    Demetri Kantarelis, Professor of Economics, Assumption College Economics and Global Studies Department, Worcester, Massachusetts
    Robert E. Prasch, Professor, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont

    In this session, four economists explore the binary economic approach to (1) promoting sustainable, economic growth and (2) reducing inequality and poverty. The binary approach is to open capital markets to broaden the process whereby capital is acquired with the earnings of capital. The concept of binary growth holds that the promise of more broadly distributed capital acquired with the earnings of capital in the future will in the present both [1] profitably employ more fully existing capacity and [2] promote more sustainable economic growth. Professor Robert Prasch, whose specialities includes the history of economic thought, will present a paper that advances the concept of “binary growth” as a distinct theory of growth that is “new” to the history of economic thought. Professors Prasch, Angresano, Kantarelis, and Whalen will then explore the possible magnitude of binary growth and discuss the economic and legal issues and questions raised by the binary approach. Attention will also be given to ways in which binary principles may be taught along with other principles of economics in courses in law and economics.
  • Law and Economics: Under Cover of Science
    Morgan Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Susan D. Carle, American University Washington College of Law
    David M. Driesen, Syracuse University College of Law James R. Hackney, Jr., Northeastern University School of Law
    Shubha Ghosh, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
    This session explores the history of the development of  the Law and Economics by way of an examination of Professor James Hackney’s recent book entitled Under Cover of Science.   Endorsed Judge Richard Posner and  Professor Duncan Kennedy, Professor Hackney’s authoritative intellectual history describes the law and economics movement from the early days of the Republic to the present and argues that the incorporation of economic analysis into legal decision making is not an inherently objective enterprise, but rather often cloaks ideological determinations – particularly regarding the distribution of wealth – under cover of science.  Professors Driesen and Carle will join the author in a discussion of the book.
  • Theology and Socio-Economics
    Clinton Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Speakers: Larry Cata Backer, The Pennsylvania State University Dickinson School of Law
    Alfreda Robinson, The George Washington University Law School
    Susan J. Stabile, St. John’s University School of Law

    Socio-economists recognize (1) that faith in a higher power affects economic behavior and (2) an understanding of how faith affects economic behavior will enhance one’s ability to address law-related economic issues. This session continues an inquiry began at last year’s annual meeting to exploring the connection between theology and Socio-economics.

3:20 - 4:20 p.m.
Black Reparations, Binary Economics, and Interest Convergence
Speakers: Robert Ashford, Syracuse University College of Law
Sarah Blanton, New York, New York
Derrick A. Bell, Jr., New York University School of Law
Anthony E. Cook, Georgetown University Law Center
Emma Coleman Jordan, Georgetown University Law Center

In his article, Professor Bell notes that progress in achieving racial and economic justice for Blacks seemingly generally depends on a convergence of Black interests with one or more of the interests embraced by the dominant power structure. In “King the and Beloved Community: A Communitarian Defense of Black Reparations,” 68 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 959 (2001, at 999-1014), Professor Cook advanced a binary economic plan (of interest to Rev. Dr. King) to finance reparation by expanding the competitive right to acquire capital with the earnings of capital. Binary economics explains how reparations can be financed without redistribution. In “Memo On Binary Economics to Attorneys for People of Color and Women Re: What Else Can Public Corporations Do For Your Clients?,” 79 St. John’s Law Review 1221 (2005) Professor Ashford has generalized Professor Cook’s argument by asserting that the binary economic approach to economic growth and distribution reveals (1) a transcendent convergent interest between Blacks and the vast majority of women, and poor and working whites and (2) hence an opportunity for economic reform. This transcendent convergent interest is in broadening the right to acquire capital with the earnings of capital. Cook and Ashford argue that the discourse regarding economic justice will be transformed beneficially in favor of the interests of Black people if binary economics is included within the discussions regarding reparations and other important issues. Professor Bell has suggested that one problem with relying on interest convergence to advance racial justice is that the convergence may not be stable over time so that lasting progress is compromised or defeated. This session explores (1) whether the binary economic approach reveals an important, stable interest convergence among Blacks, most women, poor and working people, and major corporations, and (2) whether the inclusion of binary economics in the discourse regarding reparations and other issues of race will enhance the prospects or racial and economic justice.

4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
The Future of Socio-Economics: Roundtable and Open Forum
In this final session, all of the presenters of the Section’s daylong program join in an open forum with those in attendance to discuss the future of socio-economics.

Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Student Services
Nassau Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Reassessing Student Services in Light of Change

All sessions will be held in Nassau Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York, unless otherwise stated.

9:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Welcome and Introduction
Speakers: Jill Suzanne Miller, Duke University School of Law

9:15 - 10:30 a.m.
Understanding the Millennial Law Student
Moderator: Deborah Roberts Fathree, Oklahoma City University School of Law
Speakers: Tracy Leigh McGaugh, Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center
Lindsay Watkins, LSSSE Project Manager, Indiana University Bloomington, Center for Postsecondary Research, Bloomington, Indiana

The majority of incoming law students came of age after the dawn of the new millennium. To give this some perspective, Bill Clinton was sworn into office when many of our current first-year law students were seven years old. These same students were sophomores in high school when 9/11 occurred.

In addition to the political and world events that have shaped it, this generation has at its fingertips an unprecedented amount of information and the ability to correspond in real time with people all over the world. What does this capability mean to us as law school faculty and administrators? What communication strategies should we consider in dealing with the “Millennials?” How can we best prepare this new breed of law students for life after law school? And, more importantly, what does all of this mean in terms of the evolution of lawyers and the practice of law in the years to come?

Join us to learn more about law students from the millennial generation and how we might modify our administrative and pedagogical approaches, practices, and even our attitudes, to address the unique needs of this technologically sophisticated, worldly — yet sometimes not-so-independent — generation.

10:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Break

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.
What are They Thinking, and How Do We Find Out? Best Practices for Surveying the Millenial Generation
Moderator: Julia A. Yaffee, Santa Clara University School of Law
Speakers: Vicki M. Huebner, Santa Clara University School of Law
Gita Z. Wilder, Senior Social Science Researcher, National Association for Law Placement, Washington, D.C.

Given the changing dynamic of our student population, it is all the more important to continually and effectively assess our programs and initiatives. This session will provide you with the tools you need to create questionnaires and surveys that really work from both a technical and substantive standpoint. Panelists will share their expertise on how to develop a strategy to obtain the data you need, whether employment statistics, faculty evaluations, alumni opinions, or student satisfaction ratings. The experts will also evaluate electronic survey tools available, including “Survey Monkey” and “Zoomerang.” Finally, they will discuss strategies to avoid “survey fatigue” and enhance response rates.

11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Mentoring Lunch with Colleagues

Take this time to reconnect with fellow section members or meet new members from different parts of the country in facilitated lunch groups. Members of the Section’s Executive Committee and other long-time members of the Section will lead groups of newer members to local restaurants. This is a great forum for asking questions of experienced Section members or simply meeting new colleagues. Sign-ups for lunch tables will take place during the morning sessions. Whether you have been a Section member for many years or only a short time, we hope you will join us for this terrific opportunity to connect or reconnect with other members.

1:15 - 3:15 p.m.
Is There a Doctor in the House? Psychology, Safety, and the Student Services Professional
Moderator: John R. De Rosa, Cornell Law School Career Office
Speakers: David Davar, Director, Counseling and Psychological Services, Fordham University, Bronx, New York
Jules A. Martin, Vice President of Public Safety, New York University, New York, NY

Recent tragic events have called much attention to problems which student services professionals encounter every day - students suffering from severe mental health disorders, and concerns for the safety of those students and others. We are neither mental health nor law enforcement professionals. Yet, the day-to-day demands of our jobs require that we have some knowledge of these areas. Set against the background of a hypothetical case study, this panel of experts will discuss behavioral and other disorders which student services professionals may encounter. Also discussed will be measures-both proactive and reactive-to consider when students are deemed to be a threat to themselves or others.

3:15 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Counseling for the Counselor
Moderator: Elizabeth Patton, Washington University School of Law
Speakers: Joan Newman, Founder, Joan Newman & Associates LLC, Saint Louis, Missouri
Eileen C. Travis, Director, New York City Lawyer Assistance Program New York, New York

As student services professionals, we often counsel our students on the
importance of balance and stress reduction in leading healthy, productive lives as students and citizens. However, we often are guilty of not following our own advice, which impacts our own job performance and ability to advise students. This panel will focus on ways in which we can achieve work-life balance and prevent and manage stress. Panelists will discuss time management, prioritizing work, family and other activities, and different ways to normalize stress and reduce stress both temporarily and permanently.

4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Business Meeting

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Women in Legal Education, Co-Sponsored by Sections on Aging and the Law, Family and Juvenile Law, Law and Economics, Minority Groups, Poverty Law and Socio-Economics
Regent Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Gender and Class: Voices from the Collective

All sessions will be held in Regent Parlor Second Floor, Hilton New York, unless otherwise noted

This extended program on gender and class will explore the following questions, among others:

  • How can class be more fully incorporated into mainstream legal analysis and political discourse on gender-based inequality in the United States?
  • How do economic class and economic structures intersect with other forms of subordination, such as race, gender, sexual orientation? How do they diverge?
  • What are the challenges and complications involved in bringing class analysis together with analysis of gender and other forms of subordination?
  • Is class the right concept for theorizing economic equality?

9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Section on Women in Legal Education Opening Plenary Session
Moderator: Vicki Schultz, Yale Law School
Speakers: Frances Lee Ansley, University of Tennessee College of Law
Angela P. Harris, University of California, Berkeley School of Law
Emma Coleman Jordan, Georgetown University Law Center
Martha T. Mc Cluskey, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law
Julie A. Nice, University of Denver College of Law
Michael L. Selmi, The George Washington University Law School
Rebecca Ernst Zietlow, University of Toledo College of Law

10:30 - 10:40 a.m.
Break

10:40 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

  • Children
    Regent Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Kelly Browe Olson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law
    Speakers: Annette Appell, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law
    Karen Czapanskiy, University of Maryland School of Law
    Lisa Kelly, University of Washington School of Law
    Rose Cuison Villazor, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law

This panel will discuss issues related to mothers and children living in poverty. It will cover a broad range of issues, including challenges of child advocacy given the reality of a child welfare system populated with poor women and children. Panelists will also discuss legal issues that arise for families with children who are disabled, and families separated because of immigration laws.

  • Work and Institutions
    Hudson Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Joan E. Vogel, Vermont Law School
    Speakers: Dianne Avery, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law
    Marion G. Crain, University of North Carolina School of Law
    Patricia E. Dilley, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
    Tanya Kateri Hernandez, Rutgers, The State University of N.J. Center for Law and Justice
    Susan P. Sturm, Columbia University School of Law

This panel will discuss gender and class in relation to structural inequality in employment. Among other topics, the panelists will discuss corporate branding in service sector employment and its negative implications for unionization and gender segregation; the state of old-age security supports for working-class women; the impact of gender, race, and class in the sexual harassment context; and new normative frameworks and institutions for advancing workplace participation, as well as their relationship to the anti-discrimination paradigm.

  • Work and Care
    Midtown Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Laura T. Kessler, University of Utah S. J. Quinney College of Law
    Speakers: Naomi R. Cahn, The George Washington University Law School
    Maria L. Ontiveros, University of San Francisco School of Law
    Nancy Reichman, Professor, University of Denver Department of Sociology, Denver, Colorado
    Peggie Smith, University of Iowa College of Law
    Joyce S. Sterling, University of Denver College of Law

This session explores law’s role in producing the gendered structure of care work, with particular attention to the interrelationship of the organization of care work within families and the workplace. Among other topics, the panelists will discuss the emergence of competing legal and moral systems surrounding the family in “Red” and “Blue” states, the treatment of paid immigrant caregivers and their families, efforts to unionize home-based care workers, and the gender-wage gap among new lawyers.

  • Criminalization
    Holland Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Ann Mc Ginley, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law
    Speakers: Linda Christine Fentiman, Pace University School of Law
    Zanita E. Fenton, University of Miami School of Law
    Kaaryn S. Gustafson, University of Connecticut School of Law
    Brenda V. Smith, American University Washington College of Law

    This panel will examine the roles of class and race in the State’s intrusion upon women’s lives. Panelists will discuss the criminalization of private decision making about a woman’s pregnancy in the form of “fetal protection” policies; the prosecution of women for welfare fraud; the role domestic/family violence play in increased criminal prosecutions of women; and rape and/or sexuality in the prison context.

12:15 - 1:30 p.m.
Section on Women in Legal Education Luncheon
Rendezvous Trianon, Third Floor, Hilton New York

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

1:40 - 3:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions

  • The State
    Regent Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Sylvia Wairimu Kang’ara, University of Washington School of Law
    Speakers: Elizabeth A. Pendo, St. Thomas University School of Law
    Lisa R. Pruitt, University of California at Davis School of Law
    Sidney D. Watson, Saint Louis University School of Law
    Deborah M. Weissman, University of North Carolina School of Law

This panel will consider the relationships among socioeconomic disadvantage, gender, and the State, including the extent to which the State has an obligation to provide welfare and health care benefits for its citizens.  Panelists will also consider the role of the State in preventing domestic violence, as well as in responding to its victims and consequences. They will discuss, for example, the extent to which socioeconomic insecurity contributes to the occurrence of domestic violence. Finally, panelists will assess the State’s opportunity – judicially and legislatively – to recognize and respond to other circumstances that aggravate poor women’s disadvantage and vulnerability, such as in relation to abortion access.

  • National Security
    Hudson Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Mary-Rose Papandrea, Boston College Law School
    Speakers: Diane Marie Amann, University of California at Davis School of Law
    Karima E. Bennoune, Rutgers, The State University of N.J. Center for Law and Justice
    Kathleen Clark, Washington University School of Law
    Elizabeth L. Hillman, Rutgers, The State University of N.J. School of Law, Camden

This panel will discuss the extent to which women’s issues are adequately addressed in the international legal framework, and the degree to which women’s security is encompassed in the concept of “national security.” The past twenty years have seen a dramatic increase in women’s involvement in international affairs. The panel will consider whether this enhanced involvement has resulted in increased international attention to the needs of women, including rape, forced marriage and sexual slavery. The panel will also consider the extent to which women have become victims of human rights violations, including rape and torture, as a result of the war against terrorism. Finally, the panel will analyze the changing role of women in the military, who serve in the front lines in that war. 

  • Globalization
    Midtown Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: Marjorie Florestal, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law
    Speakers: Michelle Mc Kinley, University of Oregon School of Law
    Hari Osofsky, University of Oregon School of Law
    Leticia Saucedo, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law
    Laura M. Spitz, University of Colorado School of Law

Globalization increases pressures on employers and markets to lower wages and eliminate jobs, aggravating economic disparities between the rich and the poor. These disparities are frequently even greater for women and people of color, who may already be economically marginalized. Other cross-cutting problems, such as climate change, similarly aggravate disadvantages associated with poverty, gender, and race. While free trade agreements and other international instruments sometimes purport to address such problems, in practice they may limit local and national responses to them. Panelists will address these and other intersections of gender, class, and globalization.

  • Family
    Holland Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
    Moderator: June Rose Carbone, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
    Speakers: Penelope Eileen Bryan, University of Denver College of Law
    A. Felecia Epps, University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law
    David Ray Papke, Marquette University Law School
    Tracy A. Thomas, University of Akron C. Blake McDowell Law Center

This panel will explore the implications of socioeconomic status and gender on family law. Panelists will discuss how class influences the impact that the laws of divorce, domestic violence, marital property, welfare reform, and child procreation limits have on women. These issues will also be viewed from a historical perspective, grounding issues of family law and the socioeconomic status of women in the women’s rights movement in the United States.

3:00 - 3:15 p.m.
Break

3:15 - 4:30 p.m.
Section on Women in Legal Education Closing Plenary Session
Regent Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Moderator: Cynthia G. Hawkins-Leon, Stetson University College of Law

Representatives from each concurrent session will report back in a roundtable format.

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Section on Teaching Methods, Co-Sponsored by Section on New Law Professors
Sutton North, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Attractions and Distractions: Student Use of Laptop Computers in the Classroom

Moderators: Barbara A. Glesner Fines, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
Sophie M. Sparrow, Franklin Pierce Law Center
Speakers: Robin A. Boyle, St. John’s University School of Law
Janice E. Kosel, Golden Gate University School of Law
James B. Levy, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center
Nancy G. Maxwell, Washburn University School of Law
Jana R. Mc Creary, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
Tracy Leigh Mc Gaugh, Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center
Michael W. Mullane, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville Leflar Law Center
Ruth Anne Robbins, Rutgers, The State University of N.J. School of Law, Camden
David I.C. Thomson, University of Denver College of Law

As an increasing number of law students bring laptop computers to class, law teachers are presented with new teaching challenges and opportunities. Do laptops help or hinder student learning in class? This program will explore perspectives and provide concrete solutions to this teaching challenge. Presenters will debate the issue of whether faculty should ban laptops from the classroom. They will then provide demonstrations and lead discussions on how to implement policies regarding laptop use and how to incorporate student laptop use in an effective teaching and learning environment.

Business Meeting for Section on Teaching Methods at Program Conclusion.

12:15 - 1:30 p.m.
Section on Law Libraries Luncheon
Sutton South, Second Floor, Hilton New York

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

12:15 - 1:30 p.m.
Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning and Research Luncheon
Sutton Center, Second Floor, Hilton New York

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Joint Luncheon: AALS, Conference of Chief Justices and AALS Committee on International Cooperation
Trianon Ballroom, Third Floor, Hilton New York

Speakers: Sandra Day O’Connor, Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court (1981-2006), Washington, D.C.
Ellen Gracie Northfleet, President of the Supreme Court of Brazil,

Welcome: The Honorable Jean Hoefer Toal, Chief Justice, Supreme Court of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
Moderator: T. Alexander Aleinikoff, Georgetown University Law Center

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
AALS Workshop on Local Government at Risk Luncheon
Mercury Ballroom, Third Floor, Hilton New York

Speaker: John Conyers Jr., Member, 14th District of Michigan, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

(Tickets were sold in advance of the Annual Meeting. If space is available, a ticket may be purchased at On-Site Registration until 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 2. Tickets will not be for sale at the luncheon.)

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Business Associations
Murray Hill A, Second Floor, Hilton New York
Corporate Law in Global Markets

Moderator: John C. Coffee, Jr., Columbia University School of Law
Speakers: John H. Armour, University Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
John C. Coates, Harvard Law School
Roberta S. Karmel, Brooklyn Law School
Donald C. Langevoort, Georgetown University Law Center Howell Edmunds Jackson, Harvard Law School
Kate Litvak, The University of Texas School of Law
Larry Edward Ribstein, University of Illinois College of Law

Stock Exchanges and the New Market for Securities Laws
Chris Brummer, Vanderbilt University Law School

The SEC’s Global Accounting Vision
Lawrence A. Cunningham, The George Washington University Law School

The Correlation Between U.S. Stock Prices and Cross-Listing Premia: A Challenge to Law-Based Theories of Cross-Listing
Kate Litvak, The University of Texas School of Law

One or more presenters were selected from a call for papers.

The globalization of markets for capital, products, and managers has cast a bright spotlight on domestic legal regimes, including U.S. corporate governance laws. In the first half of the session, a roundtable discussion among scholars from the U.S. and Europe will explore the international competition of corporate governance laws.

The second half of the session will feature paper presentations based on submissions made in response to the Section's Call for Pape

Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Employee Benefits, Co-Sponsored by Section on Aging and the Law
Gramercy B, Second Floor, Hilton New York
IRAs: Planning Distribution Strategies and Plan Investments

Speakers: Richard L. Kaplan, University of Illinois College of Law
Kathryn Jennings Kennedy, The John Marshall Law School
Janice Kay Mc Clendon, Stetson University College of Law
David A. Pratt, Albany Law School

IRA assets represent over $3.7 trillion in U.S. retirement savings - a third of all U.S. household assets. The Pension Protection Act of 2006 provides some new planning distribution strategies for IRA owners - qualified charitable distributions; non-spouse rollover options; and Roth IRA rollovers changes. In addition, the latest type of IRA being aggressively marketed is the self-directed real estate IRA. While they are legal, there are numerous landmines that unsuspecting owners should be aware of. This program will program an update on new planning strategies and investment possibilities for IRA owners.

Business Meeting for Section on Employee Benefits at Program Conclusion.

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Jewish Law
New York Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York
Perspectives on Teaching Jewish Law (to American Law Students)

Speakers: Samuel J. Levine, Pepperdine University School of Law
Donna Litman, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center
Chaim N. Saiman, Villanova University School of Law
David Saperstein, Director, Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, Washington, D.C.

How do we teach Jewish law in our law schools? What approaches are possible? Which have been more successful in the past? Where is there room to be more innovative in the future? What unique challenges do we face, given the complexity of Jewish law and the diversity of our student bodies? What is the overall purpose of teaching Jewish law to American law students?

The panelists will share their experiences in teaching Jewish law and offer insights on how to make a course or seminar in Jewish law a valuable experience for all law students.

Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Section on Professional Responsibility
Sutton North, Second Floor, Hilton New York
The Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education and the Future of Race and the American Legal Profession

Moderator: Robin A. Lenhardt, Fordham University School of Law
Speakers: Leonard M. Baynes, St. John's University School of Law
Russell G. Pearce, Fordham University School of Law
Deborah L. Rhode, Stanford Law School
Tommie Shelby, Associate Professor, Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
David A. Thomas, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts
David B. Wilkins, Harvard Law School

One or more presenters were selected from a call for papers.

The American legal profession is in the midst of a profound demographic transformation. Over the last forty years, law has gone from being an exclusive club for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant men of means to one in which women comprise fifty percent of new entrants and racial and ethnic minorities nearly twenty percent. Scholars exploring this transformation have tended to concentrate on two broad themes. The first is largely descriptive: How are women and minorities faring, particularly with respect to obtaining high level positions in law firms and similar institutions, and what does this say about the structure of opportunity in the profession? The second is more expressly normative: How will the growing presence of women and minorities affect the legal profession’s traditional normative commitment to what Sanford Levinson has referred to as a “bleached out” conception of the lawyer’s role?

In this session we will attempt to bring these two strands of scholarship together. We will do so in the context of Professor David Wilkins’s forthcoming book The Black Bar: The Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education and the Future of Race and the American Legal Profession (Oxford University Press), which explores how the generation of black lawyers who entered the corporate hemisphere of legal practice beginning in the late 1960’s have attempted to integrate the upper echelons of the bar while at the same time negotiating its own understanding of the relationship between personal identity (including group-based commitments) and professional role.

The program will begin with a keynote talk from Professor Wilkins. The panelists will examine his evidence and arguments from a variety of disciplines and perspectives.

Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

5:15 - 6:30 p.m.
First Meeting of AALS House of Representatives
Trianon Ballroom, Third Floor, Hilton New York

Clerk: David Alexander Brennen, AALS Deputy Director
Parliamentarian: Elliott S. Milstein, American University Washington College of Law
Presiding: Nancy H. Rogers, AALS President and The Ohio State University Michael E. Moritz College of Law

Call to Order
Adoption of Agenda
Report of AALS Executive Vice Presdient and Executive Director Carl C. Monk
Report of AALS President, Nancy H. Rogers, The Ohio State University Michael E. Moritz College of Law
Memorials

Representatives of all member schools are expected to attend this meeting of the House of Representatives. All law teachers are invited to attend.

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
AALS Reception for Law Schools’ Teachers of the Year and Emeriti Faculty Members
Mercury Rotunda, Third Floor, Hilton New York
This reception recognizes those professors who have been honored by their schools as Teachers of the Year and Emeriti faculty members.

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Section on Africa Business Meeting
Holland Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Section on Academic Suport Business Meeting
New York Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Section on International Human Rights Business Meeting
Hudson Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Section on Law, Medicine and Health Care Business Meeting
Midtown Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Section on Women in Legal Education Business Meeting
Harlem Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

Member and Fee-Paid Schools Events

7:00 - 8:30 a.m.
University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law Breakfast for International Law Faculties
Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

7:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Stetson University College of Law Breakfast for Associate Deans of Faculty Development and Research
New York Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

7:30 - 8:30 a.m.
Hamline University School of Law Alumni Breakfast
Lincoln Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
The University of Akron C. Blake McDowell Law Center Reception
Lincoln Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
American University Washington College of Law Reception
Nassau A, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Leflar Law Center Reception for Alumni and Friends
Hudson, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Boston College Law School Reception
Maloney & Porcelli, 37 East 50th Street

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Boston University School of Law Alumni and Friends Reception
Clinton Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of California, Berkeley School of Law Boalt Hall Faculty and Alumni Reception
Herald, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of California, Davis School of Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, University of Connecticut School of Law, and Rutgers University School of Law, Camden Reception
Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
California Western School of Law, New England School of Law, South Texas College of Law and William Mitchell College of Law Consortium for Innovative Legal Education Reception
Sutton Center, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law Alumni, Faculty, and Friends Cocktail Reception
Madison Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
City University of New York School of Law at Queens College Reception
Regent Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland State University Cleveland-Marshall College of Law Reception for Alumni and Friends
Soho, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of Colorado School of Law Alumni Reception
Suite, See Hotel Concierge for Suite Location, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Duke University School of Law Reception for Alumni and Friends
Central Park East, Second Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Duquesne University School of Law Alumni Reception
Chelsea, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Emory University School of Law Alumni and Faculty Reception
East Suite, Fourth Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
The George Washington University Law School Alumni Reception
Liberty 5, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Harvard Law School Cocktails and Dinner Hosted by Dean Elena Kagan
Harvard Club of New York City, 35 West 44th Street
Cocktails 6:30 p.m. – North Biddle Room, 3rd Floor
Dinner 7:00 p.m. – Biddle Room, 3rd Floor

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
University of Illinois College of Law Reception
Liberty 1 & 2, Third Floor, Sheraton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington Alumni and Friends Reception
Liberty 3, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
The University of Iowa College of Law Reception
Gramercy A, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
The John Marshall Law School (Chicago) Alumni and Friends Reception
Conference Room K, Executive Conference Center, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Reception
Concourse D, Concourse Level, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Loyola University Chicago School of Law Alumni and Friends Reception
Carnegie West, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of Maryland School of Law Dean’s Reception
Riverside Suite, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
University of Minnesota Law School Alumni and Friends Reception
Seyfarth Shaw LLP, 620 Eighth Avenue

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
University of Michigan Law School Alumni Reception
Murray Hill A, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Michigan State University College of Law Reception
Murray Hill B, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
New York Law School Reception in Honor of Dean Harry H. Wellington
Rendevous Trianon, Third Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law Reception for New York City-Area Alumni and Faculty
Sutton South, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City University School of Law Alumni and Friends Reception
Olmstead, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law Wingspread P20 Consortium Reception
Conference Room D, Executive Conference Center, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
The Pennsylvania State University Dickinson School of Law Reception
Concourse A, Concourse Level, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of Pennsylvania Law School Reception
Liberty 4, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John’s University School of Law Reception
Concourse G, Concourse Level, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Seattle University School of Law Reception and Washington Wine Tasting
Dean’s Suite, Hilton New York
Please see hotel concierge for suite location

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of South Carolina School of Law Alumni Reception
Columbia, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
University of Southern California Gould School of Law Reception for Alumni and Friends
Duffy, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Stanford Law School Reception
Carnegie East, Third Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Suffolk University Law School Reception
Nassau B, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Temple University, James E. Beasley School of Law Alumni Reception
Gramercy, Second Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Vermont Law School “Taste of Vermont” Reception
Beekman Parlor, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Wake Forest University School of Law Reception to Meet Dean Blake D. Morant
Mercury Ballroom, Third Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Washington and Lee University School of Law Reception
Conference Room J, Executive Conference Center, Sheraton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Widener University School of Law Alumni Reception
Morgan Suite, Second Floor, Hilton New York

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Yale Law School Information Society Project Reception
Metropolitan Ballroom West, Second Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers
Topic: Emerging Issues in Scholarship Post Gonzalez v. Carhart

7:00 - 9:30 p.m.
University of California at Los Angeles School of Law Reception
Empire, Seventh Floor, New York Marriott Marquis

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Pepperdine University School of Law “Napa in New York” Reception
Petit Trianon, Third Floor, Hilton New York

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Santa Clara University School of Law “A Taste of California Wine” Reception
Ben Benson’s Steak House, 123 West 52 nd Street
Reception recognizes New Distinguished Chairs: Patricia A. Cain, Allen S. Hammond IV, Jean C. Love and congratulating Professor Stephanie A. Wildman as she completes her term as a member of the AALS Executive Committee

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Tulane University School of Law Cocktail Reception for AALS Alumni and Friends
The Cornell Club New York, 6 East 44th Street

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Villanova University School of Law Reception
Celsius, Bryant Park's Ice Café (adjacent to the ice rink behind New York Public Library, located between 40th and 42nd Streets & Fifth and Sixth Avenues)

7:30 - 9:00 p.m.
John Marshall Law School (Atlanta) Reception Honoring Mr. Ken Nolan
Empire Ballroom West, Second Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

9:30 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.
Samford University Cumberland School of Law 15th Annual Deans Dessert
Sutton North, Second Floor, Hilton New York

Other Organization Events

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Lambda Legal Annual Reception
Etcetera Etcetera, 352 W. 44 th Street

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Reception for Current and Former Trustees
Central Park West, Second Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Legal Writing Institute and Association of Legal Writing Directors (ALWD) Golden Pen and Thomas Blackwell Awards Reception
Empire Ballroom East, Second Floor, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

7:00 - 10:30 p.m.
Carolina Academic Press Reception for Authors and Friends
Conference Room E, Executive Conference Center, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) Robert Cover Study Group
Conference Room F, Executive Conference Center, Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

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